Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Martin Lukacs argues that the way to avoid a Canadian Donald Trump is to ensure people have a progressive challenger to the corporate establishment: Trudeau’s social liberalism has been partnered with the very economic policies that have cemented inequality and savaged people’s quality of life—and which are now ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Sarah-Taïssir Bencharif discusses her experience facing prejudice against Muslims in Canada. But Ashifa Kassam reports on the growing public response to violence, as communities across the country formed “rings of peace” around mosques during their prayers on Friday. – Meanwhile, Maher Arar points out how Canada’s security state ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – The Canadian Labour Congress offers its suggestions as to how international trade agreements can be reworked to ensure a more fair global economy. But Bill Curry reports that we’re first more likely to see public interest regulation undermined from within Canada as the provinces sign away their authority ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: SK Government Response Too Slow

“”The secrecy around pipeline spills in Saskatchewan is astonishing,” said Keith Stewart, head of Greenpeace Canada’s climate and energy campaign, in an email on Tuesday. “First the government waits three days to announce it, then the company will neither confirm nor deny that it’s their oil. More worrisome, however, is that once again pipeline spill ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Evening Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Linda McQuaig discusses the hollow promise of “populist” billionaires who ultimately serve only to enrich themselves and their class. And Lana Payne writes about the growing protest movement which culminated in massive rallies around the world this weekend – as well as the causes of its emergence: Over ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Peter Goodman observes that any meaningful action to build a more equal economy needs to involve bolstering wages and workers’ rights – meaning that the elites-only musings in Davos miss the point entirely: Davos is — at least rhetorically — consumed with worries about the shortcomings of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Sean McElwee offers his take on the crucial failings which have led the U.S. Democrats to their current nadir in which principles and values have been discarded in the pursuit of power they’ve failed to secure. – Mike Konczal and Marshall Steinbaum highlight the importance of effective government ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – James Wilt writes that the PR campaign pushing pipelines is based largely on the false claim that the only other choice is to allow even more dangerous means of facilitating the burning of fossil fuels. And David Suzuki argues that the cost of addressing obvious environmental problems ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Owen Jones highlights the need for social democratic parties to present a real popular alternative to neoliberal government, and offers his suggestions as to how UK Labour can accomplish that: Political leadership means saying, here’s what’s wrong with society, here’s what our vision of what society is instead, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Anis Chowdhury refutes the theory that top-heavy tax cuts have anything to do with economic development: Cross-country research has found no relationship between changes in top marginal tax rates and growth between 1960 and 2010. For example, during this period, the US cut its top rate by ...

The Canadian Progressive: Manitoba Chiefs Suing Trudeau Over Enbridge’s Line 3 Pipeline Approval

The Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs is suing the Trudeau government over its approval of Enbridge’s Line 3 tar sands pipeline. First Nations leaders have repeatedly stated that no genuine reconciliation is possible as long as Canada continues to approve fossil fuel-based projects that threaten their communities and the planet. The post Manitoba Chiefs Suing Trudeau ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your year. – Michelle Chen writes that wealth inequality and social stratification are only getting worse in the U.S. And Edwin Rios and Dave Gilson chart the diverging fates of the top .01% which is seeing massive gains, and the rest of the U.S.’ population facing continued income and wealth stagnation. ...

Michal Rozworski: #RealChange wearing thin: A look back at Trudeau’s first year

We’re one year into Justin Trudeau’s government of #RealChange, yet it’s mostly the rhetoric not the policies that have changed. Some of the shine is finally wearing off. Whether approving pipelines, settting electoral reform up to fail or privatizing airports and transit, the Liberals are showing themselves to be the good capitalist managers they’ve always been, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Lynn Parramore interviews Mariana Mazzucato about the options available to build a more fair and inclusive economy even in the face of corporatist leaders like Donald Trump: LP: In your earlier book, The Entrepreneurial State, you describe a model of capitalism that would address many of these ...

A Puff of Absurdity: Standing Rock Resistance

Chris Hedges is in Standing Rock, back to his original career as a war correspondent. The natives there are preparing for winter, and I’m struck by the contrast to the Occupy fight that dwindled away when things got cold. I’m curled up on the couch as I write that, so I mean no disrespect. But ...

A Puff of Absurdity: Water as a Human Right

In a recent article in my local paper, Peter Shawn Taylor says that anyone who wants to stop Nestle from draining aquifers doesn’t understand economics and is hostile to capitalism. He implies that we can’t just label water a human right above the fray of the market without doing the same with food, clothes, and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Karen Foster and Tamara Krawchenko discuss how policy can – and should – be designed to improve intergenerational equity: Canada trails far behind other industrialized nations in its attention to intergenerational equity. The country could do far more to report on a carefully defined intergenerational equity, track ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson writes that the Libs’ fall economic statement represents a massive (and unjustified) shift away from promised infrastructure funding even while planning to privatize both existing operations and future developments. And Joie Warnock highlights why it would represent nothing short of scandalous mismanagement for the Wall ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – George Monbiot rightly makes the point that a general attitude of kindness is a must for a functioning society – while lamenting that anything of the sort is all too often lacking from public policy choices. – James Di Fiore discusses Justin Trudeau’s failed attempt at a triangulation ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Branko Milanovic highlights the futility of pretending that market mechanisms will produce anything other than profit-oriented outcomes – and the observation represents an obvious reason not to put public services in corporate hands. And David Sloan Wilson (in introducing an interview with Sigrun Aasland) points out how Norway’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Larry Beinhart argues that aside from the gross unfairness and economic harm from growing inequality, there’s a basic problem trusting the uber-rich to make reasonable decisions with massive amounts of wealth. And George Monbiot makes the case that even as he pretends to be an outsider, Donald ...

The Canadian Progressive: How a controversial dam threatens rights of Canada’s indigenous Innu people

The controversial Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project in Labrador, Canada, “relies on local Innu people giving up their own lands.” It “joins a long history of dispossession in North America.” The post How a controversial dam threatens rights of Canada’s indigenous Innu people appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jordan Brennan points out why Nova Scotia (and other jurisdictions) should move past austerity economics: The McNeil Liberals appear set to rack up budgetary surpluses through a strategy of public sector wage suppression. This is likely to backfire. It is an elementary insight of economic analysis that, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Thomas Walkom writes that the federal Libs’ idea of “real change” for the economy reflects nothing more than the same old stale neoliberal playbook: At its core, the federal government’s “bold” new plan for economic growth is strikingly familiar. The scheme, worked out by Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s ...

Politics, Re-Spun: Goodbye, Politics, Re-Spun! Hello, WePivot.net!

“Politics, Re-Spun” is now WePivot.net! but why, you scream in horror! next month is the 14th anniversary of Politics, Re-Spun…it’s time for a reframing/rebranding/pivot to something more…betterer, or more bigly, if you will. 14 years ago, in the twisted Orwellian months after 9/11 where words did not mean what words are, it was important to ...